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Amy Leah Magaw is a born-again author and freelance writer with a passion for writing country-fried Christian romance, creative non-fiction, poetry, and inspirational short stories. A mother of two active teenagers, Amy spends her days teaching middle and high school—and loving it. She spends her nights escaping to her world of writing she affectionately calls, “The Oasis.” She is available for speaking at Ladies’ Conferences and meeting your freelance writing needs.  To learn more about Amy’s writings, visit her blog at www.AmyLMagaw.com, or email Amy at AmyLMagaw@gmail.com.

Inspirational Short Stories

I hope you enjoy this sample of my work. 

"Undercover Boss"
© 2014 Amy L.Magaw
Not to be used without permission.

     Overcome by the dank, musty smell, Marie leaned back, resting her head on the metro train window.  The day had been absolutely horrible.  She was spent, irritable, and ready to soak her feet in hot water. 
     Block out the chatter…
     Just as she closed her eyes, a noise sliced through her solitude like an expertly wielded sword. In the clamor she heard it—his voice.  Her heart sank. 
     Could it be possible?
     She had to see for herself.  As she cracked one eye open, her nightmare came true.  It was him—the other odd-ball intern that she’d met today at the office. As if her own college internship at Dewey, Miller, and Associates wasn’t hard enough, she had to endure the shrill voice of this man all day long. 
     Oh, maybe if I keep my eyes closed, he’ll just keep moving down the line…
     Trying to go unnoticed, she closed her eyes.
     “HI, MARIE!” he shouted, plunging down into the seat beside her.
     She jumped so violently that her body appeared to be seizing. 
     Why me, Lord?
     She took a moment to catch her breath.
     “Oh, hello there, um…I’m sorry, I can’t remember…?” she began.
     “My name…oh, it’s Barry—you know, Barry Whitehead—from the office today?  Surely you didn’t forget me that quickly?” he answered in his loud, obnoxious tone.
     She answered in truth, “No, I must say that I haven’t forgotten you. I’m just not very good with names.  I’m sorry, Mr. Whitehead.”
     The stations whizzed by as the train ran its route.  It seemed the faster the train traveled, the faster Barry talked.  Marie had done her best to make him feel at home today, despite his annoying demeanor.  As Barry rambled on, she realized the day hadn’t gone well for him either. Perhaps this was why he sat there pouring his heart out to her—a complete stranger.  
     He may not have anyone else to turn to…
     When Barry stopped for air, Marie jumped in.
     “Mr. Whitehead, don’t give up.  Everyone has bad days, but all things are possible with God.  Ask Him to help you. Keep giving it your all.  Do you know the Lord, Mr. Whitehead?” she asked.
     “Intimately,” he said. “I know…”
     His voice was cut off by the thunder of crashing glass.  The sound of bending steel was deafening.  Smoke, ash, and burning filled her nostrils.  The salty, metallic taste in her mouth was unmistakable—blood.  In a moment, her world plunged into complete darkness—and then it was immersed in blinding light.  She was no longer engulfed in the dry, smoky, darkness.  Her skin felt cool and moist.  The ear-splitting sounds around her vanished; she felt as though she lay in the comforts of home.  Standing before her was a man dressed in white with kind eyes.  He took her hand gently.
     “Marie,” he called.
      She opened her eyes slowly.
     “What happened?  Where’s Barry? Where am I?” Marie asked.
     “You are home, my child.  The train derailed,” Jesus answered in compassion. He allowed her a moment to take it all in—the majesty and the splendor.
     She fell to her knees, “Forgive me Lord, for not bowing, I…”
     “I know, Marie.  I know that you love Me. You’ve been My child since the day you called on My Name. I usually send angels to escort My children home, but you were so kind to me today.”
     “Today, Lord?  How…?” she began.
     “I watch from Heaven from time to time, just to see how My children are behaving, like a surprise inspection,” said the Lord, speaking so that she would understand.  He held out the name tag that read Barry Whitehead.   
     “You represented Me well today,” said the Lord, extending His arm in welcome towards the shining city.  Weightlessness overtook her.  She floated towards the city as it shone brighter.  She shielded her eyes—the Glory was too much. White light became sound ringing in her ears, and then…
     “Ms. Bell?  Ms. Bell?” the paramedic called.
     Marie shouted, “Where am I? Where’s Barry?  What’s going on?”
     “There was a crash—the train derailed.  You’ve been hurt; you’ve lost a lot of blood.  We’re taking you to the hospital immediately,” the paramedic explained.
     Sadness overtook her. 
     I must have been dreaming… I’ll keep my eyes fixed above until next time, Lord.
     Then her mind returned to the more immediate reality.
     “Please,” she asked, “what happened to the young man sitting beside me?”                      
     “What young man?” the lady answered, “There was no one with you, Ma’am,”
     “Yes…yes there was.  His name is Barry Whitehead.”
     “No, Ms. Bell.  There was no one else found in your metro car,” she affirmed.
     Marie became frantic.
     “Then he was thrown from the car!  Quickly!  You must send someone to find him…” Marie insisted.
     The paramedic took Marie by the arms, attempting to calm her down.
     “Ms. Bell, the transit authority scanned for survivors; everyone from your metro car has been accounted for.”
     Marie bolted from the ambulance, ripping the intravenous lines from her arms.  She searched for an official who could search for Barry.  Her eyes lighted on two men standing beside the city’s Transit Authority van. 
     “Ma’am?  Are you okay?” one of the gentleman asked.
     “Sir, please…” Marie begged.  “…I was on the train…”
     “Yes, Ma’am—Johnson here, one of the city’s finest, pulled you out of the wreckage,” the senior officer replied.
     “Did he find the young man with me—Barry?  We must… send him back… for Barry!” Marie demanded as she nearly fainted.  She clung to the side of the van.
     “Ma’am, you were alone. We accessed the surveillance footage to account for all the passengers.  You were the last one pulled from the wreckage,” the officer said pressing the playback button.
     She watched the film in disbelief.  She saw herself leaning against the train window—asleep.  She cringed as the scene convulsed when the train derailed. Then the camera went to black snow.  Barry was not on the footage.  She appeared to have slept during the entire ride.
     “Ma’am,” began the paramedic, “you’ve been through quite an ordeal. Please come with me; we really need to get you to the hospital.”
     Marie nodded, limping back to the gurney. She tried to put her body at rest—but her mind just wouldn’t.
     “You know, from all indications, you shouldn’t be here right now,” the paramedic said as she began re-inserting tubes, “…but you’re lucky. Everyone was rescued.  There was no one else with you on the train—you were alone for entire trip.” 
     Marie suddenly smiled.
     “No… I’ve never been alone.”

            

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